EPA moves to give states, tribes more power to protect water rights

National News
By Michael Phillis & Suman Naishadham; Associated Press ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Biden administration on Thursday proposed undoing a Trump-era rule that limited the power of states and Native American tribes to block energy projects like natural gas pipelines based on their potential to pollute rivers and streams. The Clean Water Act allows states and tribes to review what effect pipelines, dams and some other federally regulated projects might have on water quality within their borders. The Trump administration sought to streamline fossil fuel development and made it harder for local officials to block projects. The Biden administration’s proposed rule would shift power back to states, tribes and territories. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan said in a statement that the agency’s draft regulation would empower local entities to…
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OPINION: Everyone can help keep pollution out of Payette Lake

Idaho News
The Star-News We are on the cusp of another robust summer season on Big Payette Lake. The Big Payette Lake Water Quality Council wants you to know that we have reintroduced Lake*A*Syst. This is a five-part packet on how to help prevent pollutants and contaminants from entering the lake. This pertains to homeowners, landscapers, builders/contractors and other activity that can impact the water quality from the shoreline. You can find these informative packets at https://bigpayettelake.org. The up-to-date information is divided into the following: Preventing Contamination of Drinking Water, Lawn and Garden, Roads and Driveways, Landscape and Construction and Stormwater Runoff. The website also has a Resource Guide for further access to more specific information. Now is the time to educate yourself on best practices to ensure Payette Lake’s beautiful waters.…
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Five decades after Clean Water Act, half of US waters too polluted to swim or fish

National News
By Amanda Brandeis; Scripps National Correspondent SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Voted into law a half-century ago, the Clean Water Act of 1972 is still far from achieving its ambitious goals. The landmark law aimed to make U.S. waters safe for swimming and fishing by 1983. It also promised to eliminate all discharges of pollutants into navigable waters by 1985. "There were really outrageous incidents of pollution that really brought the issue of water pollution to the public’s attention," said Tom Pelton, director of communications for the Environmental Integrity Project (EIP). In 1969, the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland was so polluted that it caught fire. Nearly always covered in oil slicks, industrial runoff polluted the water for decades. "And it happened before in the '50s and the '40s. So much oil…
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Idaho Water Quality Workshop

Please join Idaho DEQ and Boise State University for the 32nd annual Idaho Water Quality Workshop.  It is the longest-running and best-attended gathering of water quality professionals in the state.  Agenda topics will include stream restoration, nutrient and metal pollution, reservoirs and more. The conference will be held March 16-17, 2022, in Boise.  We will have a hybrid format, so you can choose whether to attend in person or virtually. Attendees and presenters hail from Idaho and neighboring states, and include agencies, consultants, tribes, cities, academics, and the public.  This mix provides outstanding opportunities for discussion and networking.  Unlike almost every other conference, attendance is free.  That includes drinks, snacks, and an afternoon social hour. If you would like to join us, please register on the website.
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EPA acts to curb air, water pollution in poor communities

National News
By Matthew Daly, AP News WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency announced a series of enforcement actions Wednesday to address air pollution, unsafe drinking water and other problems afflicting minority communities in three Gulf Coast states, following a “Journey to Justice” tour by Administrator Michael Regan last fall. The agency will conduct unannounced inspections of chemical plants, refineries and other industrial sites suspected of polluting air and water and causing health problems to nearby residents, Regan said. And it will install air monitoring equipment in Louisiana’s “chemical corridor” to enhance enforcement at chemical and plastics plants between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The region contains several hotspots where cancer risks are far above national levels. The EPA also issued a notice to the city of Jackson, Mississippi, saying its…
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